History for the Rest of Us

The Incredible Hulk – 50

The Incredible Hulk – 50

Apr 27, 2012

The Hulk was created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, and first appeared in The Incredible Hulk #1 in May 1962. The alter ego of the mild-mannered physicist Dr. Bruce Banner, the Hulk is a giant humanoid monster. Dr. Banner was exposed to the test detonation blast of a gamma bomb he invented, which ‘created’ the Hulk. Anger, terror and grief trigger the transformation of the normally withdrawn Dr. Banner into the raging Hulk. His strength grows in direct proportion with the level of emotion experienced by Dr. Banner. The inspiration of the Hulk was a combination of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Frankenstein according to Stan Lee. The Hulk was depicted in a live-action television series and five made-for-television movies with Lou Ferrigno as the Hulk and Bill Bixby as Dr. David Banner. Hulk appeared in two movies, Hulk in 2003, and The Incredible Hulk in 2008. He will also have a role in the 2012 movie The Avengers. If you are looking for books, dvds, or hulk apparel, check out our Hulk store: The Incredible Hulk Store [polldaddy poll=6177687] Related Stories: Bugs Bunny Garfield Batman Li’l...

Spanish-American War

Spanish-American War

Apr 25, 2012

The ten week Spanish–American War of 1898 was fought both in the Caribbean and the Pacific. The war was primarily due to American involvement in the Cuban War of Independence. Decades of Cuban revolts against Spanish rule had been closely watched by the United States and by 1897–98, American public opinion had solidified because of the Spanish atrocities that had been reported. After the battleship Maine mysteriously sank in Havana harbor, political pressure in the United States came to a head and forced the hand of President McKinley into a war he had hoped to avoid. When a compromise couldn’t be reached, the United States sent an ultimatum demanding that Spain immediately surrender control of Cuba. The ultimatum was rejected. Madrid declared war, and then on April 25, 1898 Washington formally declared...

Batman

Batman

Apr 25, 2012

Originally published April 25, 1939, Batman was known as “The Bat-Man”, but over the course of time has also gone by other names such as “The Caped Crusader”, and “The Dark Knight”. Batman’s alter-ego, Gotham City millionaire Bruce Wayne, was witness to the murder of his parents as a child leading him to swear vengeance on all criminals. Batman possesses no superpowers but instead makes use of natural abilities, technology, wealth, etc. in his fight against crime, making him a more attainable superhero. Aided in his fight against crime by Robin, Alfred – the butler, police commissioner Gordon, and others, he battles colorful villains which have been a key factor in the success of the character. These include Joker, Riddler, Penguin, and Catwoman. In 1940, Batman got his own comic book title, and in the 1960s the television series starring Adam West gave him a less dark, very colorful image. In the late 1980s and early 1990s a new series of Batman movies moved the character back to his darker roots, and with the release of the latest Batman movies, Batman Begins, and The Dark Knight, the move towards the traditional darker Batman has continued. Image from the book The Essential Batman Encyclopedia available at our store: Batman Store [polldaddy poll=6170904] Related Stories: Bugs Bunny Garfield The Incredible Hulk Li’l...

Was the Indictment Against Jesus Illegal?

Was the Indictment Against Jesus Illegal?

Apr 24, 2012

SOURCE: THE TRIAL OF JESUS FROM A LAWYER’S STANDPOINT by WALTER M. CHANDLER OF THE NEW YORK BAR LAW “The entire criminal procedure of the Mosaic Code rests upon four rules: certainty in the indictment; publicity in the discussion; full freedom granted to the accused; and assurance against all dangers or errors of testimony.”—Salvador, “Institutions de Moïse,” p. 365. “The Sanhedrin did not and could not originate charges; it only investigated those brought before it.”—Edersheim, “Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah,” vol. i. p. 309. “The evidence of the leading witnesses constituted the charge. There was no other charge: no more formal indictment. Until they spoke, and spoke in the public assembly, the prisoner was scarcely an accused man. When they spoke, and the evidence of the two agreed together, it formed the legal charge, libel, or indictment, as well as the evidence for its truth.”—Innes, “The Trial of Jesus Christ,” p. 41. “The only prosecutors known to Talmudic criminal jurisprudence are the witnesses to the crime. Their duty is to bring the matter to the cognizance of the court, and to bear witness against the criminal. In capital cases, they are the legal executioners also. Of an official accuser or prosecutor there is nowhere any trace in the laws of the ancient Hebrews.”—Mendelsohn, “The Criminal Jurisprudence of the Ancient Hebrews,” p. 110. FACT AND ARGUMENT The Gospel records disclose two distinct elements of illegality in the indictment against Jesus: (1) The accusation, at the trial, was twofold, vague, and indefinite, which Mosaic law forbade; (2) it was made, in part, by Caiaphas, the high priest, who was one of the judges of Jesus; while Hebrew law forbade any but leading witnesses to present the charge. A thorough understanding of [this] Point…depends upon keeping clearly in mind certain well-defined elementary principles of law. In the first place, it should be remembered that in most modern jurisdictions an indictment is simply an accusation, carries with it no presumption of guilt, and has no evidentiary force. Its only function is to bring the charge against the prisoner before the court and jury, and to notify the accused of the nature of the accusation against him....

Theodore Roosevelt – Man in the Arena Speech

Theodore Roosevelt – Man in the Arena Speech

Apr 23, 2012

On April 23, 1910, Theodore Roosevelt gave his “Citizenship in a Republic” speech at the Sorbonne in Paris, France. The speech is more commonly referred to as “The Man in the Arena”. The most famous lines of the speech are as follows: It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat. This portion of the speech was a favorite of President Richard Nixon. He cited the speech in both his victory address and in his resignation. Related Stories: Lincoln Wins Nomination Marilyn Sings to JFK Man in Arena Speech Reagan Bombing in 5 Ike for...