Chocolate Chip Cookie History

Chocolate Chip Cookie History

In 1930, Ruth Graves Wakefield and her husband Kenneth purchased the Toll House Inn in Whitman Massachusetts where they served traditional colonial meals. Ruth’s tradition was to serve homemade cookies that the travelers who stopped there could take home. While preparing chocolate cookies, she realized she didn’t have the baker’s chocolate she needed. She quickly chopped a Nestle semi-sweet chocolate bar into small pieces and put the ‘chips’ into the batter thinking they would melt while baking. To her surprise, the ‘chips’ didn’t completely melt. She served them anyway. The cookies were a big success. She included the recipe in her cookbook ‘Toll House Tried and True Recipes’. Eventually she sold the recip to Nestle in exchange for a lifetime supply of chocolate chips. There is a contrasting story from one-time head chef George Boucher, and an employee at the Inn. He indicates that the large Hobart mixer dislodged chocolate bars on the shelf which fell into the dough. He persuaded Mrs. Wakefield to use the dough anyway which led to the invention of the Chocolate Chip...
Oreo Cookie

Oreo Cookie

On March 6, 1912, Oreo cookies were first introduced to the American public. The first Oreo rolled of the line at the Chelsea Market bakery in Manhattan, where the street has been renamed ‘Oreo Way’. The manufacturer, the National Biscuit Company (now Nabisco) informed its sales agents that it was preparing to offer three new varieties of biscuit, one of which was the ‘Oreo Biscuit’. Oreos were packaged in bulk tins and sold to grocers for 30 cents per pound. The first Oreo was sold in Hoboken, New Jersey. The name evolved over time including the names ‘Oreo Sandwich’ and ‘Oreo Creme Sandwich’. Though by far the most popular of this type of cookie, Oreo was not the first. Hydrox Cookies first appeared on the shelves more than two years earlier on January 1, 1910. The signature pattern of the wafer, is stamped by brass rollers passing over chocolate dough, consists of several four-leaf clovers surrounding the word ‘Oreo’. Originally the cookie was embossed with a thin wreath around the outer edge and the name Oreo on the plain surface in the middle. Oreo Cookies are the world’s favorite cookie, being sold in more than 100 countries with annual sales of over $1.5 billion. Oreo’s social media reach has made it one of the top five Facebook brand pages in the world. Some of the varieties of Oreo Cookies sold throughout the world include: Triple Double Oreo – US Double Stuf Oreo Heads or Tails – US Oreo Green Tea Ice Cream – China Oreo Double-Fruit – China Oreo Orange Ice Cream – Indonesia Oreo Trio Chocolate – Mexico...
History of Fruitcake

History of Fruitcake

According to culinary legend, ancient Egyptians created the first version of the fruitcake for placement on the tombs or in the coffins of friends and relatives, perhaps as a food that could survive their journey into the afterlife. If the Egyptians felt the same way I do about fruitcake, they must have thought those friends and relatives were going somewhere other than heaven. Fruitcake became common in Roman times due to traits that made it perfect for fueling the Roman army. Made from a combination of barley mash, raisins, pine nuts, and pomegranate seeds, this early version of fruitcake was a portable, long-lasting, relatively light combat ration. Requiring no preparation, and averse to spoilage, the cake could be shipped around the empire with ease, and became a staple in the legionnaire’s diet. As an energy source it was extremely efficient. Pomegranate seeds pack 234 calories per cup, while raisins provide 435 calories per cup. Both pale in comparison to pine nuts which weigh in at 916 calories per cup. Pretty significant when you consider that nearly two thousand years later, the average Meals Ready to Eat or MRE used in today’s military contains approximately 1,250 calories. Fruitcake continued to fuel the armies of Europe during the ensuing centuries. The Crusaders also brought the energizing treat along in their packs on their search for the Holy Grail. Their cakes incorporated additional ingredients such as fruits, honey, and spices. It was during this time when the name fruitcake was first used. The cakes became more flexible during this time period as well, with different ingredients being added based on availability and...