Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death

Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death

Patrick Henry’s ‘Give me Liberty, or Give me Death!’ speech was made to the Virginia Convention on March 23, 1775. Delivered at St. John’s Church in Richmond, Virginia, the speech is credited with swinging the balance in convincing the Virginia House of Burgesses to pass a resolution that would deliver Virginia Troops to the Revolutionary War. Attendees at the Convention included George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. March 23, 1775 by Patrick Henry No man thinks more highly than I do of the patriotism, as well as abilities, of the very worthy gentlemen who have just addressed the house. But different men often see the same subject in different lights; and, therefore, I hope it will not be thought disrespectful to those gentlemen if, entertaining as I do opinions of a character very opposite to theirs, I shall speak forth my sentiments freely and without reserve. This is no time for ceremony. The question before the house is one of awful moment to this country. For my own part, I consider it as nothing less than a question of freedom or slavery; and in proportion to the magnitude of the subject ought to be the freedom of the debate. It is only in this way that we can hope to arrive at the truth, and fulfill the great responsibility which we hold to God and our country. Should I keep back my opinions at such a time, through fear of giving offense, I should consider myself as guilty of treason towards my country, and of an act of disloyalty toward the Majesty of Heaven, which I revere above all earthly...
Chief Joseph Surrenders

Chief Joseph Surrenders

Chief Joseph was Chief of a tribe of Nez Perce Indians. He had led his people in resistance to the white men settling in the Nez Perce’s lands in the Oregon Territory. Ordered to move to Idaho in 1877, or face retribution, the Nez Perce agreed to move onto a reservation. After tribe members killed four white settlers, he and his people fled for Canada with the U.S. Army in pursuit. They had several battles as they moved through Washington, Idaho, and Montana on their way to Canada. The tribe had traveled approximately 1700 miles and, after a five-day battle, they found themselves in dire conditions. Within 40 miles of Canada, Chief Joseph surrendered on October 5, 1877 in the Bear Paw Mountains of Montana Territory. The following is Chief Joseph’s speech: October 5, 1877 Tell General Howard I know his heart. What he told me before, I have it in my heart. I am tired of fighting. Our Chiefs are killed; Looking Glass is dead, Ta Hool Hool Shute is dead. The old men are all dead. It is the young men who say yes or no. He who led on the young men is dead. It is cold, and we have no blankets; the little children are freezing to death. My people, some of them, have run away to the hills, and have no blankets, no food. No one knows where they are – perhaps freezing to death. I want to have time to look for my children, and see how many of them I can find. Maybe I shall find them among the dead. Hear me,...